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momatalks:

I came across this interesting project by artist Candy Chang: “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas…”
Candy asks: “But what if we could share with full discretion?” In this work from 2012, called ‘Confessions’ she created a public art project that invited people to anonymously share their confessions and see the confessions of the people around them in the heart of the Las Vegas strip.

More about this work, from the artist’s website:
Inspired by Shinto shrine prayer walls, Post Secret, and Catholicism, she created a place where people could write and submit their confessions on wooden plaques in the privacy of confession booths. Candy hung the anonymous plaques on the gallery walls each day and painted select responses on large canvases. 
By the end of the exhibit, over 1500 confessions were displayed on the walls. Here are a few:
I still love her two girlfriends and five years later
Came here married to one girl and left married to two girls
I stole over 15,000 from the company I work for
I’m afraid I’ll die young just like my mother
I’m in love with my best friend – too bad he’s married
I feel some days that I’m socially unacceptable
I don’t know what I am doing and I’m running out of time…

Candy’s currently featured in the exhibition Futures Project at the Centre for the Living Arts in Mobile, Alabama which opened in May and runs through December 2013 - so you can check it out if you are in the area.

momatalks:

I came across this interesting project by artist Candy Chang: “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas…”

Candy asks: “But what if we could share with full discretion?” In this work from 2012, called ‘Confessions’ she created a public art project that invited people to anonymously share their confessions and see the confessions of the people around them in the heart of the Las Vegas strip.

More about this work, from the artist’s website:

Inspired by Shinto shrine prayer walls, Post Secret, and Catholicism, she created a place where people could write and submit their confessions on wooden plaques in the privacy of confession booths. Candy hung the anonymous plaques on the gallery walls each day and painted select responses on large canvases. 

By the end of the exhibit, over 1500 confessions were displayed on the walls. Here are a few:

I still love her two girlfriends and five years later

Came here married to one girl and left married to two girls

I stole over 15,000 from the company I work for

I’m afraid I’ll die young just like my mother

I’m in love with my best friend – too bad he’s married

I feel some days that I’m socially unacceptable

I don’t know what I am doing and I’m running out of time…

Candy’s currently featured in the exhibition Futures Project at the Centre for the Living Arts in Mobile, Alabama which opened in May and runs through December 2013 - so you can check it out if you are in the area.

momatalks:

Two Sides: From Concrete to Abstract

What is the most concrete means of communication you can think of? For me, its language.  Language is the way we practice collective understanding. It allows us to understand complex systems, share new ideas, and at a basic level, relate to each other. 

Many artists have used language in their work - from Yoko Ono’s instructional Fluxus works to Barbara Kruger’s collaged paintings and prints-  text has a rich history within modern and contemporary art practice.  

The three collection examples of work above from Joseph Kosuth, John Baldessari, and Lawrence Weiner find new meaning in language.  For these artists, language is not a means of  concrete expression but an way to convey abstract idea that forces viewers to consider more than just the meaning of words they are reading. What should we make of an artist painting the definition of the word “definition”? Is painting text about what a painting is a painting at all? Does Lawrence Weiner really want someone to shoot the wall? 

These questions are exactly what is behind these works - forcing us to think abstractly about something that is otherwise very concrete in our lives- the definition of a word or object or the description of something physically visible . Language here is an expression of an idea that goes beyond the meaning of each word, sentence, or phrase.  From the concrete world of text, these three artists show us that language, like paint, clay, or other materials, can be molded, bent, or altered to create something entirely new.

Sheetal Prajapati, Associate Educator, Public Programs

Times Square Midnight Moment - Bjork’s video Mutual Core directed by Andrew Thomas Huang playing in Times Square

Bjork’s video for Mutual Core on view in Times Square throughout the month of March

Bjork’s video for Mutual Core on view in Times Square throughout the month of March

momatalks:

a beautiful moment

carlosbaila:

Marina Abramovic meets Ulay

“Marina Abramovic and Ulay started an intense love story in the 70s, performing art out of the van they lived in. When they felt the relationship had run its course, they decided to walk the Great Wall of China, each from one end, meeting for one last big hug in the middle and never seeing each other again. at her 2010 MoMa retrospective Marina performed ‘The Artist Is Present’ as part of the show, a minute of silence with each stranger who sat in front of her. Ulay arrived without her knowing it and this is what happened.”

(via momatalks)

Windows of New York by Jose Guizar

Windows of New York by Jose Guizar

artlog:

The Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci’s portrait of Lisa del Giocondo, is one of the world’s most widely recognized and reproduced artworks. The critic Robert Hughes called it the first painting that “made the leap from artwork to an icon of mass consumption.” In a new show at Allegra LaViola gallery, Andrea Mary Marshall invokes a line of artists riffing off the icon, including Dali, Duchamp, and Warhol. (When the painting visited the Metropolitan Museum in 1962, feted by the Kennedys, Warhol quipped, “Why don’t they just have someone copy it and send the copy? No one would know the difference.”)
Marshall takes the homages one step further and becomes the portrait’s subject, a character she calls “Gia Condo,” in an ongoing performance at the gallery. If you’re at all familiar with Marshall’s work, you won’t be surprised to see Gia Condo in a transparent dress and cat eye sunglasses with cigarette in hand.

artlog:

The Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci’s portrait of Lisa del Giocondo, is one of the world’s most widely recognized and reproduced artworks. The critic Robert Hughes called it the first painting that “made the leap from artwork to an icon of mass consumption.” In a new show at Allegra LaViola gallery, Andrea Mary Marshall invokes a line of artists riffing off the icon, including Dali, Duchamp, and Warhol. (When the painting visited the Metropolitan Museum in 1962, feted by the Kennedys, Warhol quipped, “Why don’t they just have someone copy it and send the copy? No one would know the difference.”)

Marshall takes the homages one step further and becomes the portrait’s subject, a character she calls “Gia Condo,” in an ongoing performance at the gallery. If you’re at all familiar with Marshall’s work, you won’t be surprised to see Gia Condo in a transparent dress and cat eye sunglasses with cigarette in hand.

momatalks:

I came across this interesting project by artist Candy Chang: “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas…”
Candy asks: “But what if we could share with full discretion?” In this work from 2012, called ‘Confessions’ she created a public art project that invited people to anonymously share their confessions and see the confessions of the people around them in the heart of the Las Vegas strip.

More about this work, from the artist’s website:
Inspired by Shinto shrine prayer walls, Post Secret, and Catholicism, she created a place where people could write and submit their confessions on wooden plaques in the privacy of confession booths. Candy hung the anonymous plaques on the gallery walls each day and painted select responses on large canvases. 
By the end of the exhibit, over 1500 confessions were displayed on the walls. Here are a few:
I still love her two girlfriends and five years later
Came here married to one girl and left married to two girls
I stole over 15,000 from the company I work for
I’m afraid I’ll die young just like my mother
I’m in love with my best friend – too bad he’s married
I feel some days that I’m socially unacceptable
I don’t know what I am doing and I’m running out of time…

Candy’s currently featured in the exhibition Futures Project at the Centre for the Living Arts in Mobile, Alabama which opened in May and runs through December 2013 - so you can check it out if you are in the area.

momatalks:

I came across this interesting project by artist Candy Chang: “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas…”

Candy asks: “But what if we could share with full discretion?” In this work from 2012, called ‘Confessions’ she created a public art project that invited people to anonymously share their confessions and see the confessions of the people around them in the heart of the Las Vegas strip.

More about this work, from the artist’s website:

Inspired by Shinto shrine prayer walls, Post Secret, and Catholicism, she created a place where people could write and submit their confessions on wooden plaques in the privacy of confession booths. Candy hung the anonymous plaques on the gallery walls each day and painted select responses on large canvases. 

By the end of the exhibit, over 1500 confessions were displayed on the walls. Here are a few:

I still love her two girlfriends and five years later

Came here married to one girl and left married to two girls

I stole over 15,000 from the company I work for

I’m afraid I’ll die young just like my mother

I’m in love with my best friend – too bad he’s married

I feel some days that I’m socially unacceptable

I don’t know what I am doing and I’m running out of time…

Candy’s currently featured in the exhibition Futures Project at the Centre for the Living Arts in Mobile, Alabama which opened in May and runs through December 2013 - so you can check it out if you are in the area.

momatalks:

Two Sides: From Concrete to Abstract

What is the most concrete means of communication you can think of? For me, its language.  Language is the way we practice collective understanding. It allows us to understand complex systems, share new ideas, and at a basic level, relate to each other. 

Many artists have used language in their work - from Yoko Ono’s instructional Fluxus works to Barbara Kruger’s collaged paintings and prints-  text has a rich history within modern and contemporary art practice.  

The three collection examples of work above from Joseph Kosuth, John Baldessari, and Lawrence Weiner find new meaning in language.  For these artists, language is not a means of  concrete expression but an way to convey abstract idea that forces viewers to consider more than just the meaning of words they are reading. What should we make of an artist painting the definition of the word “definition”? Is painting text about what a painting is a painting at all? Does Lawrence Weiner really want someone to shoot the wall? 

These questions are exactly what is behind these works - forcing us to think abstractly about something that is otherwise very concrete in our lives- the definition of a word or object or the description of something physically visible . Language here is an expression of an idea that goes beyond the meaning of each word, sentence, or phrase.  From the concrete world of text, these three artists show us that language, like paint, clay, or other materials, can be molded, bent, or altered to create something entirely new.

Sheetal Prajapati, Associate Educator, Public Programs

Times Square Midnight Moment - Bjork’s video Mutual Core directed by Andrew Thomas Huang playing in Times Square

Bjork’s video for Mutual Core on view in Times Square throughout the month of March

Bjork’s video for Mutual Core on view in Times Square throughout the month of March

momatalks:

a beautiful moment

carlosbaila:

Marina Abramovic meets Ulay

“Marina Abramovic and Ulay started an intense love story in the 70s, performing art out of the van they lived in. When they felt the relationship had run its course, they decided to walk the Great Wall of China, each from one end, meeting for one last big hug in the middle and never seeing each other again. at her 2010 MoMa retrospective Marina performed ‘The Artist Is Present’ as part of the show, a minute of silence with each stranger who sat in front of her. Ulay arrived without her knowing it and this is what happened.”

(via momatalks)

Windows of New York by Jose Guizar

Windows of New York by Jose Guizar

artlog:

The Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci’s portrait of Lisa del Giocondo, is one of the world’s most widely recognized and reproduced artworks. The critic Robert Hughes called it the first painting that “made the leap from artwork to an icon of mass consumption.” In a new show at Allegra LaViola gallery, Andrea Mary Marshall invokes a line of artists riffing off the icon, including Dali, Duchamp, and Warhol. (When the painting visited the Metropolitan Museum in 1962, feted by the Kennedys, Warhol quipped, “Why don’t they just have someone copy it and send the copy? No one would know the difference.”)
Marshall takes the homages one step further and becomes the portrait’s subject, a character she calls “Gia Condo,” in an ongoing performance at the gallery. If you’re at all familiar with Marshall’s work, you won’t be surprised to see Gia Condo in a transparent dress and cat eye sunglasses with cigarette in hand.

artlog:

The Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci’s portrait of Lisa del Giocondo, is one of the world’s most widely recognized and reproduced artworks. The critic Robert Hughes called it the first painting that “made the leap from artwork to an icon of mass consumption.” In a new show at Allegra LaViola gallery, Andrea Mary Marshall invokes a line of artists riffing off the icon, including Dali, Duchamp, and Warhol. (When the painting visited the Metropolitan Museum in 1962, feted by the Kennedys, Warhol quipped, “Why don’t they just have someone copy it and send the copy? No one would know the difference.”)

Marshall takes the homages one step further and becomes the portrait’s subject, a character she calls “Gia Condo,” in an ongoing performance at the gallery. If you’re at all familiar with Marshall’s work, you won’t be surprised to see Gia Condo in a transparent dress and cat eye sunglasses with cigarette in hand.

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